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Public urged to Vote for Sunderlands Northern Spire Bridge for Global Engineering Award


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Public urged to Vote for Sunderlands Northern Spire Bridge for Global Engineering Award


"What a wonderful honour it is for our beautiful Northern Spire bridge to be nominated for the ICE Peoples Choice Award, especially given the extremely high standard of the other projects nominated"
Sunderland City Council Leader Cllr Graeme Miller



People in the North East are urged to back the Northern Spire Bridge in Sunderland to win the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) People’s Choice Award, which celebrates the best civil engineering projects of the year that have made a positive impact for their local communities.

Northern Spire is a new landmark bridge dominating Sunderland’s skyline, which opened in August 2018.

The 100m A-frame pylon was transported by sea and river to the site, before being raised into position during a carefully orchestrated two-day operation. The 330m deck was built alongside and launched across the river.

Northern Spire is competing against projects including the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge, the Shed cultural centre in New York City, the Colwyn Bay Waterfront in Wales, and a children’s surgery facility in Leeds.

Penny Marshall, Regional Director of ICE North East, said:

“Civil engineering is all around us, with Northern Spire providing a fantastic example of how civil engineers safeguard the future for people and their families.

“It’s central to a new strategic road, linking the A19 to Sunderland city centre and Port of Sunderland, and is already creating economic growth and development opportunities by significantly improving connectivity locally and across the region

“The project deserves to be recognised and the People’s Choice Award gives members of the community the perfect opportunity to celebrate how Northern Spire has made a difference.”

Sunderland City Council Leader Cllr Graeme Miller said:

“What a wonderful honour it is for our beautiful Northern Spire bridge to be nominated for the ICE People’s Choice Award, especially given the extremely high standard of the other projects nominated.

"There is no doubt that Northern Spire is an impressive scheme, which required a great deal of programme and project management expertise to plan for and execute the complex nature of the works. We are all very proud of our city's new landmark and the impact it has had, especially over the past year on our community, and it's wonderful to know that it's also being recognised nationally, too.

“I urge all Sunderland residents, vote for your bridge, let’s get this award.”

Voting will open at www.ice.org.uk/Peopleschoiceaward on 9 September, closing on 27 September. All voters will be entered into a prize draw to win an Amazon Echo. The public can follow award updates on social media using #ICEPeopleschoice. The winning project will be revealed on 12 November.

In 2018, more than 70,000 people around the world cast a vote for one of their favourite civil engineering projects, with the top prize going to the Kaikōura earthquake recovery project in New Zealand. The project rebuilt 194 kilometres of road and 150 kilometres of rail, restoring links to isolated communities, following the damage caused by a 7.8 magnitude earthquake in November 2016.

People in the North East are urged to back the Northern Spire Bridge in Sunderland to win the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) People’s Choice Award, which celebrates the best civil engineering projects of the year that have made a positive impact for their local communities.

Northern Spire is a new landmark bridge dominating Sunderland’s skyline, which opened in August 2018.

The 100m A-frame pylon was transported by sea and river to the site, before being raised into position during a carefully orchestrated two-day operation. The 330m deck was built alongside and launched across the river.

Northern Spire is competing against projects including the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge, the Shed cultural centre in New York City, the Colwyn Bay Waterfront in Wales, and a children’s surgery facility in Leeds.

Penny Marshall, Regional Director of ICE North East, said:

“Civil engineering is all around us, with Northern Spire providing a fantastic example of how civil engineers safeguard the future for people and their families.

“It’s central to a new strategic road, linking the A19 to Sunderland city centre and Port of Sunderland, and is already creating economic growth and development opportunities by significantly improving connectivity locally and across the region

“The project deserves to be recognised and the People’s Choice Award gives members of the community the perfect opportunity to celebrate how Northern Spire has made a difference.”

Sunderland City Council Leader Cllr Graeme Miller said:

“What a wonderful honour it is for our beautiful Northern Spire bridge to be nominated for the ICE People’s Choice Award, especially given the extremely high standard of the other projects nominated.

"There is no doubt that Northern Spire is an impressive scheme, which required a great deal of programme and project management expertise to plan for and execute the complex nature of the works. We are all very proud of our city's new landmark and the impact it has had, especially over the past year on our community, and it's wonderful to know that it's also being recognised nationally, too.

“I urge all Sunderland residents, vote for your bridge, let’s get this award.”

Voting will open at www.ice.org.uk/Peopleschoiceaward on 9 September, closing on 27 September. All voters will be entered into a prize draw to win an Amazon Echo. The public can follow award updates on social media using #ICEPeopleschoice. The winning project will be revealed on 12 November.

In 2018, more than 70,000 people around the world cast a vote for one of their favourite civil engineering projects, with the top prize going to the Kaikōura earthquake recovery project in New Zealand. The project rebuilt 194 kilometres of road and 150 kilometres of rail, restoring links to isolated communities, following the damage caused by a 7.8 magnitude earthquake in November 2016.

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